Picasso to Abramović: introducing our 2020 exhibitions

Picasso to Abramović: introducing our 2020 exhibitions


We’ll begin 2020 at the Royal Academy with one of the giants of modern art. Picasso and Paper is the first exhibition to explore the full range of Picasso’s work in this universal medium. From scraps transformed into sculptures to drawings, etchings, cut-outs and collage this show will span his entire career and take you into the heart of his creative process. Next up, we’ll present highlights from northern Europe’s finest collection of Impressionist and Post-Impressionist paintings. Denmark’s Ordrupgaard Museum is a treasure trove of paintings by the likes of Monet, Morisot, Renoir and Gauguin many of which haven’t been seen in the UK before. From the sun-dappled Impressionists to something a little more introspective. The Belgian Leon Spilliaert was an artist of graphic brilliance and psychological intensity. If you’re new to his work, prepare to be drawn into the windswept, twilight world of a truly distinctive imagination. June brings our annual celebration of art made now: the Summer Exhibition. The world’s largest open-submission art exhibition. It’s a tradition that’s over 250 years old and it’s still at the heart of what we do. And right at the start of it all was Angelica Kauffman, one of the founding members
of the Academy. Kauffman succeeded against the odds in the male-dominated
18th-century art world, and this exhibition follows her trajectory from child prodigy to one of Europe’s most sought-after painters. Paul Cézanne’s paintings of the rugged landscapes of his native France are amongst the most extraordinary
of his career. From the primeval Forest of Fontainebleau to the sun-drenched south, this focused exhibition will unite some of the finest examples of his rock and quarry paintings, and literally get under the surface
of landscape. Then in the autumn we’ll devote our Main Galleries to the legendary Marina Abramović. This exhibition will be an immersive journey through more than 40 years of brace and brilliant art. It will recreate iconic works, invite audience participation and use new technology to push the very definition
of performance art. In October, we’ll present an artist revered in her home country who deserves much greater recognition on a world stage. Rita Angus was one of the greatest New Zealand painters of the 20th century. A committed pacifist and a free thinker her work evokes the natural beauty and independent spirit of her homeland. Finally, a conversation across time between two artists. Tracey Emin has long had an affinity for the art of Edvard Munch. In the winter, she’ll present
a deeply personal response to his work and its themes, with a selection of her own works alongside key loans from
Oslo’s Munch Museum. So there you have it a year that takes us from the 18th century right up to the present, via some of the greatest names in art and with some exciting discoveries
along the way.

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